Links for Palaeobotanists

Home / Palynology


Palynology

Categories
Palynolocical Associations
Palynology
Palynofacies
Acritarchs
Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others

! Triassic Palynology@
! Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
! Palynological Preparation Techniques@
! Triassic Palynology@
! Palynology Databases@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@















Home / Palynology / Palynological Associations


Categories
Palynology
Palynofacies
Acritarchs
Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others

! Triassic Palynology@
International Palaeobotanical and Palaeontological Institutions@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Search for Palaeobotanists, Botanists and Palaeontologists@
Botany and Biology Institutions@
Selected Botanical Gardens and Herbaria@
Natural History Museums@
Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@


Palynological Associations


Alexa (Alexa Internet, Inc., an Amazon.com Company). Alexa is a Web Information Company, perhaps best known for the Alexa Rank, the website ranking system which tracks over 30 million websites worldwide. See especially: The top ranked sites in category "Science". Go to:
! Palynology.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists, (AASP): WORLDWIDE PALYNOLOGY E-MAIL & WWW DIRECTORY. See also:
Meeting Information. This page contains information pertinent to the AASP annual meeting and the meetings of related societies. There is also access to the abstracts and programs of former meetings of the AASP.

AASP Data Committee, American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists (this web site is made available by the Department of Geology at the University of Toronto): Palydisks. Downloadable collection of palynology files. Includes bibliographies, pollen diagrams, statistics, and various related programs. The Palydisks are in the "public domain" available for exchange, with explicit acknowledgement of the original author.

Associazione Italiana Per lo Studio del Quaternario (AIQUA).

Asociación Latinoamericana de Paleobotánica y Palinología (ALPP)

The British Micropalaeontological Society (the former British Micropalaeontological Group (BMG). The original aims of the BMG were to promote micropalaeontology in the U.K., to encourage the multidisciplinary study of British type sections and to provide a means of communication. Today membership is open to all persons and organisations engaged or actively interested in the science of micropalaeontology in the British Isles or in the British geological sequence. The society comprises five groups, dealing with conodonts, foraminifera, nannofossils, ostracods, and last but not least palynology. Visit the Palynology Group.

Canadian Association of Palynologists (CAP). Members of CAP are palynologists from universities, industry and government agencies. The association focusses on palynology from all geologic eras, spanning the Palaeozoic to the Quaternary. Palynologists from all branches of the discipline, from stratigraphic palynology, to palaeoecology, to melissopalynology, participate in the Association.

Commission Internationale de Microflore du Paléozoique (C.I.M.P.). C.I.M.P. is an international federation of palynologists interested in Palaeozoic palynology. The commission aims to advance knowledge in palynology and related subjects by the promotion of international co-operation and meetings between scientists of all regions and countries.
Worth checking out: Links.

Commision Internationale de Microflore Paléozoique (C.I.M.P.), Subcommission on Spores and Pollen.

Commision Internationale de Microflore Paléozoique (C.I.M.P.), Acritarch Subcomission.

! Owen Kent Davis, Department of Geosciences University of Arizona, Tucson: Links to Palynology and Palynologists, Palynologist´s Pages. See also: Palynology, Links to Academic Sites, Palynology Educators. Web pages and email addresses for ninety-two palynologists at academic institutions in North America.

Group of European Charophyte Specialists (GEC)

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP): Micropaleontological Reference Centers. MRCs provide scientists with an opportunity to examine microfossils of various geologic ages, and from a globally distributed set of locations.

International Federation of Palynological Societies (IFPS). IFPS is a federation of regional, national, linguistic, and specialist palynological organizations of the world. Its goals are to advance knowledge in palynology and related subjects by promotion of international cooperation and sponsorship of regular meetings between palynologists of all countries and regions. See also:
Palynos Newsletters. Provided by the International Federation of Palynological Societies.

International Humic Substances Society: The motto of IHSS is "To Advance the Knowledge, Research and Application of Humic Substances". For scientists with interest in humic substances in the coal, soil, and water sciences, and to provide opportunities for them to exchange ideas, skills, and viewpoints. See also here.

The International Nannoplankton Association (hosted by The Natural History Museum in London): INA is a semi-formal association of scientists worldwide who have an interest in living or fossil nannoplankton - including coccolithophores, nannoliths, and other nannofossils such as silicoflagellates and calcisphere.

The International Research Group on Charophytes (IRGC). The IRGC promotes and coordinates international co-operation on charophyte research, including on living and fossil specimens from all geological ages.

The Low Latitudes Dinoflagellates Working Group. (part of the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists).

! The Micropalaeontological Society (TMS). TMS exists to advance the education of the public in the study of micropalaeontology. go to: Palynology.

NAMS, the North American Micropaleontology Section of the Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM). The purpose of the Section is to promote all aspects of micropaleontology through application, research and education dealing with morphology, biostratigraphy, ecology/paleoecology, and geologic history of all groups of microfossils occurring in the stratigraphic record.

NordForsk, Oslo, Norway: The pollen/landscape calibration (POLLANDCAL) network. A network for research training on Quantitative reconstructions of past land-use/land-cover and floristic diversity inferred from fossil pollen data. Go to: Network members.

The Palynological Society of Japan.

PalyPort. Grupo Informal de Palinólogos de Língua Portuguesa (The Portuguese Palynologists Group).

Save NHM Micropalaeontology. This website is created as a focus for protest against the proposed closure of the Natural History Museum´s Micropalaeontology Research Group. Sign the petition.

! Society for the Promotion of Palynological Research in Austria, Faculty Centre of Biodiversity (the former Institute of Botany), Vienna: PalDat - Palynological Database. An Online Publication on fossil and recent Pollen and Spores.









Home / Palynology / Palynology


Categories
Palynolocical Associations
Palynofacies
Acritarchs
Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others

! Triassic Palynology@
! Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
! Palynological Preparation Techniques@
! Palynology Databases@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@


Palynology


AASP - The Palynological Society (the former "American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists Foundation"):
! What is Palynology? Including some links about the history of palynology. See especially:
Palynology: Principles and Applications. Excellent!

Keith W. Abineri, West Borough, Wimborne, Dorset, UK: Palynology - a microscopic view into the past. Illustrated with residues from treated Dorset coast sediments. See also: MICROSCOPIC FRAGMENTS OF MESOZOIC CONIFER WOOD FOUND IN THE KIMMERIDGE CLAY AND PURBECK SEDIMENTS AND RELATED TOPICS.

Alexa (Alexa Internet, Inc., an Amazon.com Company). Alexa is a Web Information Company, perhaps best known for the Alexa Rank, the website ranking system which tracks over 30 million websites worldwide. See especially: The top ranked sites in category "Science". Go to:
! Palynology.

Areawide Pest Management Research Unit (APMRU), U.S. Department of Agriculture: Pollen as Indicators of Source Areas and Foraging Resources. Pollen and spore images. Including search for micrographs by family or specific epithet.

Volker Arnold, Museum of Prehistory in Dithmarschen at Heide, Germany: Amber: A Perfect Fossil Trap. Go to: Pollen Grains Extracted from Oise Amber.

A.B. Beaudoin (1996): What is palynology? C.A.P. Newsletter, 19: 11-17.

! Alwynne B. Beaudoin, Canadian Association of Palynologists (CAP): World Wide Web Sites for Palynologists. The following list reflects an idiosyncratic selection of WWW sites (plus a few gopher, ftp, and telnet sites) which may contain information of relevance to palynologists and palaeobotanists. See also:
Highlights from Recent CAP Newsletters. Selected articles online in palynology. Worth checking out:
A CAREER AS A PALYNOLOGIST.

Alwynne B. Beaudoin, Canadian Association of Palynologists (CAP): Highlights from Recent CAP Newsletters. Selected articles online in palynology.

Alwynne B. Beaudoin, Canadian Association of Palynologists (CAP): A List of Theses by Canadian Palynologists and about Canadian Palynology.

John H. Beck, Boston University and Weston Observatory Paleopalynology of the Silurian Arisaig Group, Nova Scotia.

! A. Bercovici et al. (2009): Improving depth of field resolution for palynological photomicrography. PDF file, Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol. 12.

Sylvain Bernard et al. (2007): Exceptional preservation of fossil plant spores in high-pressure metamorphic rocks PDF file, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 262: 257-272.

S. Blackmore (2007): Pollen and spores: Microscopic keys to understanding the earth´s biodiversity. In PDF, Pl. Syst. Evol., 263: 3-12.

! The Botanical Society of America: The American Journal of Botany Cover Images Index. The collection on the page holding the cover images of the American Journal of Botany. A great set of images! See also:
! Online Image Collection. This page acts as a map to the entire collection. Images are classified in groups in which they were submitted for historical purposes, e.g. Pollen.

The Botanical Society of America: Online Image Collection. This is a collection of approximately 800 images available for instructional use. The site is run by a search engine database, designed and maintained by Scott Russell; slides scanned by Tom Jurik and Dave Webb. The copyright and any intellectual property rights for these images are retained by the individual donors. Visit "Set 10 - Pollen". Slides contributed by Darlene DeMason and Marsh Sundberg and others.

British Micropalaeontological Society. The society comprises five groups, dealing with conodonts, foraminifera, nannofossils, ostracods, and last but not least palynology. Visit the Palynology Group. See also:
Book Reviews.

R.C. Brown and B.E. Lemmon (2011): Spores before sporophytes: hypothesizing the origin of sporogenesis at the algal-plant transition. In PDF, New Phytologist, 190: 875-881.

Palynology at The University of Calgary Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Calgary.

! The Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN): CHIN is a national centre of excellence that provides a visible face to Canada's heritage through the world of networked information. Go to:
Artefacts Canada, Natural Sciences. Artefacts Canada Natural Sciences is a database based on the collections information provided by contributing museums. Images are displayed when available! Go to:
Botany,
Palynology, or
Palaeontology
.

Canright, J.C. 1995: A Brief History of Some Major Contributors to the Development of Palynology in the United States. Palynos 18(2): 2-7.

Michael Charnine, Keywen. Encyclopedia of Keywords (www.keywen.com) is a general encyclopedia that provides basic information on a wide range of subjects in an easily readable and understandable format (more than 250,000 articles). Go to:
> Glossaries > Glossary of Geology > Palynology. An annotated link list.

! The Commission Internationale de Microflore du Paléozoique (C.I.M.P.): Links.

Simon Connor and Eliso Kvavadze (2008): Pollen microphotographs from Georgia, Caucasus (PDF file, 1.9 MB, PalaeoWorks). This contribution presents 166 photographs of pollen grains that are commonly encountered in sediments from Georgia.

Bruce Cornet: Applications and Limitations of Palynology ... Lucas, S.G. and M. Morales, eds., 1993. The Nonmarine Triassic. New Mexico Museum Of Natural History & Science Bulletin No.3, p. 75-93.

! Owen Davis, Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson: PALYNOLOGY. This site has pointers to palynology definitions and illustrations, palynology references, AASP Palydisks and links to other palynology organizations and other palynologists. Excellent! Worth checking out: Palynology Sites & People. See also: PALYNOLOGY WEB SITES OF THE MONTH for 1998-99.

! Owen Davis, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ: Palynology Definitions. See also: PALYNOLOGY - POLLEN. Key to 17 basic pollen classes.

Owen Kent Davis, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona Tucson: QUATERNARY PALYNOLOGY AND PLANT MACROFOSSILS. Lecture notes. Go to: Pollen Diagrams.

! Owen Kent Davis, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson: Palynology. This page outlines information about palynology in the broadest sense. Go to Palynology Definitions & Illustrations . Excellent! See also: UofA Palynology Web Site of the Month. Worth to visit: Catalog of Internet Pollen and Spore Images.

Owen Davis, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ: Pictures of Pollen Grains on the WEB. A link list.

dmoz: Science: Biology: Botany: Paleobotany: Palynology.

Palynology Laboratory Collections, Human History, Archaeology Collections, The Provincial Museum of Alberta, Edmonton

G. Erdtman, (Core Historical Literature of Agriculture, Cornell University Library): An introduction to pollen analysis. Chronica Botanica Company, Waltham, Mass., 1897.

! The European Pollen Database (EPD). EPD is a non-profit structure made available free of charge to the scientific community.

Susanne Feist-Burkhardt, Institute for Geology and Palaeontology Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany, and Jörg Pross, Institute and Museum for Geology and Palaeontology University of Tübingen, Germany: New methods in light microscopy and their application to fossil dinoflagellate cysts. The application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM is a conventional microscope which is equipped with a laser light source, the laser scanning head, an automatic focusing stage, and connected to a monitor and PC.

Kenneth L. Finger, Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley, CA: What Are Microfossils?

! Fossil Pollen Database (FPD). Developed by Nicolas Garnier at Medias-France. Search and view interface for fossil pollen data from Europe. FPD allows a quick visualisation of the data, showing either the percentages or presence of a pollen taxon or a group of taxa at a given site, in a given latitude/longitude range, and within a given time interval.

Ralph M. Fyfe et al. (2009): The European Pollen Database: past efforts and current activities. PDF file, Veget. Hist. Archaeobot., 18: 417-424.

Sharma Lynn Gaponoff, AASP Newsletter 36: Palynology Storyboard (Powerpoint presentatation).

! Geotimes, July 2002: Highlights . Discoveries in the Earth Sciences. Now Geotimes offer the Highlights section (summaries of research trends and discoveries) in full online. Go to: Fredrick J. Rich and Gordon D. Wood, Palynology.

Robert Grant-Downton, book review: Pollen terminology. An illustrated handbook, by M. Hesse et al. (2009).

David G. Green, School of Environmental and Information Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Albury , New South Wales: Paleo Life, and via Australian National University´s Bioinformatics Hypermedia Service: Palynology & palaeoclimatology. This information and resources will be of interest to pollen analysts and others interested in palaeoclimates and palaeoenvironments.

!Eric C. Grimm, Illinois State Museum, Research and Collections Center, Springfield, IL: TiliaGraph. See also here, and there (Tilia and TiliaGraph, Frequently Asked Questions).

! Alan Hadley, U.K.: CombineZ Movie CZM). The purpose of this free program is to increase depth of focus by combining pictures, but each picture should be in focus at a different depth into the scene. The program is especially useful to microscope users (e.g. palynomorphs) and macro photographers. Excellent! CZM is the latest version, it can process movies, take pictures, and has more macro commands but still has all of the functionality of the former CombineZ5. Still available:
CombineZ5. It works with older versions of windows, but is not maintained anymore. See also:
Yahoo Group combinez,
Forum discussions (Digital Grin), or
Wikipedia, CombineZM.
Tutorials are here (flickr), and there (Brian Valentine).
See also here (about Interactive Digital Photomontage), and a review of Helicon Focus and CombineZ5 software (by John Hollenberg, Digital Outback Photo).

Guy Harrington, Palaeontologia Electronica Vol. 8 (2); October 2005. Book review: The Palynology and Micropalaeontology of Boundaries. Edited by Alwynne Beaudoin and Martin Head; Geological Society Special Publication 230, (2004) 355 pages.

! Helicon Soft Ltd., Kharkov, Ukraine: Helicon Focus. This is a shareware program that creates a completely focused image from several partially focused images by combining the focused areas. You can download and use the program for evaluation purposes for 30 days. Helicon Focus is designed for macrophotography, microphotography (fluid inclusions!) and hyperfocal landscape photography to cope with the shallow depth-of-field problem. Excellent!
See also here, and there (in German).

Andy Henderson (Natural History Museum, London), Ian Boomer (University of Newcastle), and Giles Miller (Natural History Museum, London): Micropalaeontological Web Sites.

Michael Hesse et al. (2009): Pollen Terminology. An illustrated handbook. Abstract: "The term palynology was coined after a written discussion with Ernst ANTEVS and A. Orville DAHL in the Pollen Analysis Circular no. 8 by HYDE and WILLIAMS (1944)".

J. Hladil et al. (2010): Dust. A geology-orientated attempt to reappraise the natural components, amounts, inputs to sediment, and importance for correlation purposes. PDF file, Geologica Belgica, 13: 367-384.

Christa-Ch. Hofmann, Institute of Palaeontology, University of Vienna: Pollen and spores tell nearly everything...- and often nothing. Abstract, The International Plant Taphonomy Meeting 2002, Bonn, Goldfuss Museum, Institute of Paleontology, Germany.

! Feli Hopf, Peter Shimeld, Stuart Pearson, Pollen Image Management, School of Environmental and Life Sciences at the University of Newcastle, Australia (website hosted by Australasian Quaternary Association): The Newcastle Pollen Collection. This pollen collection offers a text or a graphics search.

The Illinois State Museum, Springfield: The North American database (NAPD). The NAPD Unacquired Sites Inventory, in the form of a MapPad datafile, lists approximately 2000 sites (with summary information) that are candidates for inclusion in NAPD. See how to retrieve data or applications.

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP): Micropaleontological Reference Centers. MRCs provide scientists with an opportunity to examine microfossils of various geologic ages, and from a globally distributed set of locations.

Interim Register of Marine and Nonmarine Genera IRMNG, (a project of OBIS Australia). IRMNG is designed to assist in the provision of marine species data, by permitting the discrimination of marine from nonmarine (and extant from fossil) species records. Go to:
IRMNG genera list. Interim Register of Marine and Nonmarine Genera v.2.1.1, spores and pollen genera.

International Federation of Palynological Societies (IFPS): The 11th IPC (International Palynological Congress), Granada, Spain, July 04-09, 2004.

The International Research Group on Charophytes (IRGC). The aims of IRGC are to promote and coordinate international cooperation in charophyte research, including living and fossil material of all geological periods, and to encourage the integration and synthesis of all aspects of both botanical and paleobotanical study of charophytes.

A.H. Jahren, Johns Hopkins University: The carbon stable isotope composition of pollen. The d13C value of plant tissue is increasingly used to infer environmental and ecological conditions in modern and ancient environments. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 2004, 132(3-4), 291-313.

! J. Jansonius and D.C. McGregor (1996): Introduction, Palynology: Principles and Applications. AASP Foundation. v. 1, pp 1-10: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE p.1-2.. The history of palynology.

Carlos Jaramillo et al. (2010): The origin of the modern Amazon rainforest: implications of the palynological and palaeobotanical record. PDF file, Amazonia, Landscape and Species Evolution: A Look into the Past, 1st edition. Edited by C. Hoorn and F.P. Wesselingh.

David M. Jarzen, Paleobotany Division, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida: What Is Palynology?

! T.P. Jones and Nick P. Rowe (eds.), Google Books (some pages are ommitted): Fossil plants and spores: modern techniques. Published by Geological Society, 1999, 396 pages. Excellent! Click: "Preview the book". Go to page 47:
Light microscopy of fossil pollen and spores.

Petra Kaltenrieder and Peter von Ballmoos, Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, Switzerland: Introduction to Pollen Analysis. Go to: Illustrated key to the 44 pollen- and spore types found in quarternary sediments in Switzerland.

Charles A. Knight et al. (2010): On the Relationship between Pollen Size and Genome Size. PDF file.

M.H. Kurmann and T.N. Taylor (1984): Comparative ultrastructure of the sphenophyte spores Elaterites and Equisetum. PDF file, Grana, 23: 109-116. See also here.

Linda M. Larsson (2009): Palynostratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic transition in southern Sweden. PDF file, GFF, 131: 147-163. See also here.

! Links for Palaeobotanists: Progress in Palaeobotany and Palynology.

Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum, London: The Former British Petroleum Microfossil Collection (in 1991 BP donated to the Natural History Museum London). The database, a record of BP’s exploration activity since the 1950s, hold details of material from over 3,500 individual well runs. The collection includes micropalaeontological assemblage slides and residues; palynological slides and residues and nannofossil slides from wells and outcrop from over 120 countries world-wide.

! M. Macphail and G.S. Hope (2003): Natural Histories: An illustrated guide to fossil pollen and spores preserved in swamps and mires of the Southern Highlands, NSW. PalaeoWorks Technical Report 1. 134 pollen and spore taxa as colour images.

! L. Mander et al. (2012): Tracking Taphonomic Regimes Using Chemical and Mechanical Damage of Pollen and Spores: An Example from the Triassic-Jurassic Mass Extinction.

A.A. Manten (1967): Lennart von Post and the foundation of modern palynology. PDF file, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 1: 11-22. An outline of fossil pollen grain research on page 15 (PDF page 5).

R. Mathieu et al.: Manuel de Micropaléontologie . (in French). The Handbook of Micropaleontology. See also here (in PDF).

Giles Miller (website hosted by Natural History Museum, London): Curator of Micropalaeontology´s Blog.

Palaeobotanical Research Group, Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster, Germany. History of Palaeozoic Forests, MODES OF PRESERVATION. Link list page with picture rankings. The links give the most direct connections to pictures available on the web.

MuseumStuff.com:
Palynology.
Methods Of Study.
A History Of Palynology.

National Climatic Data Center (NCDC):
NOAA Paleoclimatology Program, Boulder, CO, Global Pollen Database. With data from Africa, the Americas, and northern Asia. This database continues to grow as new data are organized and made available by various regional data cooperatives such as the Indo-Pacific Pollen Database, the Latin American Pollen Database, and the North American Pollen Database.

! The Neotropical Paleoecology Research Group (website created by W.D. Gosling): NEOTROPICAL POLLEN DATABASE. Registration procedure needed. The purpose of this database is to assist in the identification of Neotropical pollen. Searchable according to family or genus, or as a multiple access key. The database contains photographs of >1000 taxa most commonly found in fossil pollen spectra.

Florin Neumann, Department of Geology, University of Toronto: Internet Discussion Lists of Interest to Palynologists. Versions of this article originally appeared in CAP Newsletter 17(2):27-29, 1994, and AASP Newsletter 28(1):20-21, 1995.

! National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC. NOAA Paleoclimatology. NOAA Paleoclimatology operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology which distributes data contributed by scientists around the world. Paleo data come from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments, and extend the archive of climate back hundreds to millions of years. Go to:
Fossil and Surface Pollen Data. The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program distributes the product of various collaborative efforts to collect and organize pollen records from around the globe (pollen counts and related information). Data contributed since March 2005 are available from the Neotoma Paleoecology Database.

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, Oklahoma: Paleobotany and Micropaleontology. The Leonard R. Wilson Collection of Micropaleontology and Paleobotany comprises approximately 3800 samples with associated palynological preparations (ca. 50,000 microscope slides), 8000 macrofossil specimens, and comparative modern plant material.

Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA: Isoetes. Including the Bibliography of Isoetes and the Isoetes Spore Library (PDF file).

Matthew Olney, University College, London: An insight into micropalaeontology. The purpose of this site is to provide an introduction to the subject of micropalaeontology based on microfossil images. Go to: Spores and Pollen.

Jeffrey M. Osborn: Palynology (PDF file).

PalaeoWorks. (Department of Archaeology and Natural History and the Resource Management in Asia-Pacific Program, the Australian National University (ANU), Canberra). Palaeoecology and archaeobotany in the Asia-Pacific region. Go to: Databases. Pollen databases, e.g. the INDO-PACIFIC POLLEN DATABASE, THE AUSTRALASIAN POLLEN AND SPORE ATLAS, and data booklets.

PalyPort. Grupo Informal de Palinólogos de Língua Portuguesa (The Portuguese Palynologists Group). Go to: Links.

! Palynos Newsletters. Provided by the International Federation of Palynological Societies.

pollen.researchpronto.com (?): Pollen Resources. A link directory. Go to: Fossil Pollen Resources.

Ruud J. Poort, Henk Visscher, and David L. Dilcher: Zoidogamy in fossil gymnosperms: The centenary of a concept, with special reference to prepollen of late Paleozoic conifers. The National Academy of Sciences, PNAS 1996 93: 11713-11717.

Hugh Rance, City University of New York: The Present is the Key to the Past. An electronic, college level, introductory historical geology textbook.

Olaf Ronneberger, Lehrstuhl für Mustererkennung und Bildverarbeitung, Institut für Informatik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg: 3D Invariants for Automated Pollen Recognition. PDF file (57.8 MB!), Dissertation.

David Ward Roubik and Jorge Enrique Moreno Patiño (website is hosted by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute): Pollen and Spores of Barro Colorado Island. Spore and pollen images from the plates of their 1991 book, published by the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew: Plant Micromorphology Bibliographic Database. A database of references relevant to the anatomy and pollen/spore morphology of flowering plants, gymnosperms and ferns. Free of charge. Registration gives access to a much larger number of references. There is a search option looking for palaeobotany!

Valentí Rull, Barcelona: High-impact palynology in petroleum geology. Worth checking out: Palynomorph pictures, and Links to Palynology/Palecplogy.

Valentí Rull, Dept. Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Is the Lost World really lost? Palaeoecological insights into the origin of the peculiar flora of the Guayana Highlands. PDF file, Naturwissenschaften, 91:139–142, 200

! J.D. Schiffbauer et al. (2012): Thermally-induced structural and chemical alteration of organic-walled microfossils: an experimental approach to understanding fossil preservation in metasediments. In PDF, Geobiology, 10: 402-423.

Jochen Schmidt, die Tageszeitung (taz): Pollen und Aussterbeereignisse (in German). State of the art report about palynological research in the capital city of Germany.

Thomas Servais and Charles Wellman (2004): New directions in Palaeozoic palynology. Abstract, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 130: 1-15.

The Centre for Palynology, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Sheffield.

Michael G. Simpson: Palynology (Powerpoint presentatation).

James "Bo" Slone, Department of Geology, Auburn University, AL: Taphonomy of Holocene Palynomorphs in the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta, Alabama. Thesis proposal.

P. Steemans and E. Javaux (Editors), (Carnets de Géologie / Notebooks on Geology: Memoir 2005/02): Pre-Cambrian to Palaeozoic Palaeopalynology and Palaeobotany. Online articles from a meeting, organized by the NFSR Working Group: "Micropaléontologie végétale et Palynologie (MVP)" and supported by the NFSR, the University of Liège, and the French Community of Belgium (May 11, 2005).

Palynological laboratory, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm

Maryland Archeobotany, The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, Maryland´s State Museum of Archaeology, St. Leonard: See also: How To Read A Pollen Diagram.

W. Soepboer and A.F. Lotter (2009): Estimating past vegetation openness using pollen-vegetation relationships: A modelling approach. PDF file, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 153: 02-107.

! Alfred Traverse, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, and Herbert J. Sullivan, Amoco Canada Petroleum Co., Ltd. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: The Background, Origin, and Early History of the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists. History of Palynology; Palynology 7: 7-18 (1983).See also:
Biographies & Histories of Palynology. Including the link directory: "History of Palynology").

Alfred Traverse, H. Tate Ames and William Spackman (1970): The Catalog of fossil spores and pollen: History and status. Abstract, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 10: 165-173.

Richard Tyson, Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry, Newcastle Research Group (NRG), Newcastle: Kerogen image gallery index. These images concentrate mainly on non-palynomorph particulate organic matter, plus some oil-prone "algal" palynomorphs.

Unit of Micropalaeontology, University College, London (website written, designed and produced by Matthew Olney, University College, London, U.K., now at Northern Illinois University, U.S.A.): MIRACLE, the Microfossil Image Recovery And Circulation for Learning and Education web-site. Go to: Palynology, and Spores and Pollen.

U.S. Geological Survey: Spores and Pollen.

John Utting et al.: REWORKED MIOSPORES IN THE UPPER PALEOZOIC AND LOWER TRIASSIC OF THE NORTHERN CIRCUM-POLAR AREA AND SELECTED LOCALITIES. Abstract, Palynology, 28: 75-119; 2004.

! Department of Ultrastructure Research and Palynology, Institute of Botany, University of Vienna: Paldat. The database includes a detailed description of the pollen grain (shape in dry and hydrated condition, apertural details, wall-stratification and ornamentation, pollen coatings and cellular condition), images of each pollen grain (LM, SEM and TEM) and basic literature on each genus.

Mittsy Voiles and Al Stenstrup: What Information Do Paleobotanists Use to Study Ancient Climates? PDF file, Global Change Education Resource Guide, L.L. Mortensen (ed.), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring.

Adam Walanus and Dorota Nalepka: POLPAL 2004. An application for plotting pollen diagrams, counting pollen grains, and performing numerical analysis.

Charles H. Wellman et al. (2009): Spore wall ultrastructure in the early lycopsid Leclercqia (Protolepidodendrales) from the Lower Devonian of North America: Evidence for a fundamental division in the lycopsids. PDF file, American Journal of Botany, 96: 1849-1860.

! Charles H. Wellman and Jane Gray (2000): The microfossil record of early land plants. PDF file, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B, 355: 717-732.

! Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
Micropaleontology,
Palynology,
Pollen,
Spores, Palynofacies, and
A history of palynology.
See also: The German Wikipedia:
Palynologie,
Pollen, und
Sporen (in German).

YAHOO: Science:Biology:Botany: Palynology.

Dan Yeloff and Chris Hunt (2004): Fluorescence microscopy of pollen and spores: a tool for investigating environmental change. Abstract.









Home / Palynology / Palynofacies


Categories
Palynolocical Associations
Palynology
Acritarchs
Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others
! Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
! Palynological Preparation Techniques@
! Triassic Palynology@
! Palynology Databases@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@


Palynofacies


Keith W. Abineri, West Borough, Wimborne, Dorset, UK: Palynology - a microscopic view into the past. Illustrated with residues from treated Dorset coast sediments. See also: MICROSCOPIC FRAGMENTS OF MESOZOIC CONIFER WOOD FOUND IN THE KIMMERIDGE CLAY AND PURBECK SEDIMENTS AND RELATED TOPICS.

About.com: Palynofacies.

! David J. Batten and Darrin T. Stead (2007): Palynofacies Analysis and its Stratigraphic Application. PDF file; In: Koutsoukos, Eduardo A.M. (ed.) Applied Stratigraphy. Series: Topics in Geobiology, Vol. 23.
See also here (in PDF) and there (Google books).

British Micropalaeontological Society. The society comprises five groups, dealing with conodonts, foraminifera, nannofossils, ostracods, and last but not least palynology. Visit the Palynology Group.

B. Buchardt and M.V. Nielsen (1991): Comparison of organic geochemical and palynofacies methods: Example from the Upper Triassic Gassum Formation in Denmark. PDF file, Bull. geol. Soc. Denmark, 38: 267-277.

Marcelo de Araujo Carvalho, (Rio de Janeiro), Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany: Paleoenvironmental reconstruction based on palynological and palynofacies analyses of the Aptian-Albian succession in the Sergipe Basin, northeastern Brazil. Thesis, PDF file (4,141 KB).

Andreas Clausing and Jürgen A. Boy (2000): Lamination and primary production in fossil lakes: relationship to palaeoclimate in the Carboniferous-Permian transition. Abstract, Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 181: 5-16.

T. Dixon (2013): Palynofacies and Palynological Analysis of Late Triassic Sediments from the Kentish Knock-1 Well (Northern Carnarvon Basin, NW Australia). Reconstruction of vegetation history, interpretation of climate and sea level changes and placement in regional zonation. In PDF, thesis, Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo.

! Susanne Feist-Burkhardt and Annette E. Götz (2002): Kompaktkurse, Palynofazies und Sequenzstratigraphie (K1). PDF file, in German. SEDIMENT 2002, Frankfurt am Main - Darmstadt.

Annette E. Götz et al. (2005): Distribution of sedimentary organic matter in Anisian carbonate series of S Poland: evidence of third-order sea-level fluctuations. PDF file, Int. J. Earth Sci. (Geol Rundsch), 94: 267-274.

! J.I. Hedges and R.G. Keil (1995): Sedimentary organic matter preservation: an assessment and speculative synthesis. PDF file, Marine Chemistry, 49.

C.A. Jaramillo and F.E. Oboh-Ikuenobe (1999): Sequence stratigraphic interpretations from palynofacies, dinocyst and lithological data of Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene strata in southern Mississippi and Alabama, U.S. Gulf Coast. PDF file, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 145: 259-302.

Ruta B. Limaye et al. (2007): Non-pollen palynomorphs as potential palaeoenvironmental indicators in the Late Quaternary sediments of the west coast of India. PDF file, CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 92, NO. 10.

Joshua M. Lukaye (2009): Biostratigraphy and Palynofacies of Four Exploration Wells from the Albertine Graben, Uganda. PDF file, adapted from oral presentation.

Joyce Macpherson, Memorial University, St. John´s, Newfoundland (Canadian Association of Palynologists): Picea Stomata in Lake Sediments. A bibliography.

J.G. Mendonça Filho et al.: Organic Facies: Palynofacies and Organic Geochemistry Approaches. In PDF.

Benson N. Modie (2007), Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest: The palaeozoic palynostratigraphy of the Karoo supergroup and palynofacies insight into palaeoenvironmental interpretations, Kalahari Karoo Basin, Botswana. PDF file, 46.5 MB! Abstract is shown here.

Palaeobotanical Research Group, Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms University, Münster, Germany. History of Palaeozoic Forests, MODES OF PRESERVATION. Link list page with picture rankings. The links give the most direct connections to pictures available on the web.

Francisca E. Oboh-Ikuenobe et al. (2005): Lithofacies, palynofacies, and sequence stratigraphy of Palaeogene strata in Southeastern Nigeria. Journal of African Earth Sciences 41: 79-101.

! G. Pieñkowski and M. Waksmundzka (2009): Palynofacies in Lower Jurassic epicontinental deposits of Poland: tool to interpret sedimentary environments. Go to: page 21, PDF file, Episodes, 32.

Jörg Pross et al. (2006): Delineating Sequence Stratigraphic Patterns in Deeper Ramp Carbonates: Quantitative Palynofacies Data from the Upper Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) of Southwest Germany. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 76: 524-538.

! Society for the Promotion of Palynological Research in Austria, Faculty Centre of Biodiversity (the former Institute of Botany), Vienna: PalDat - Palynological Database. An Online Publication on fossil and recent Pollen and Spores.

P. K. Strother, Paleobotanical Laboratory at Weston Observatory: Grand Canyon: Paleobotanical Research on the Bright Angel Shale. Fossil spore polyads and a dyad as well as cryptospores and spore clusters of Middle Cambrian age.

! Alfred Traverse (2005): Sedimentation of Organic Particles. Provided by Google books, e.g.: R.A. Gastaldo: The genesis and sedimentation of phytoclasts with examples from coastal environments.

Richard Tyson, Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry, Newcastle Research Group (NRG), Newcastle: Kerogen image gallery index. These images concentrate mainly on non-palynomorph particulate organic matter, plus some oil-prone "algal" palynomorphs.

Richard V. Tyson and Ben Follows (2000): Palynofacies prediction of distance from sediment source: A case study from the Upper Cretaceous of the Pyrenees. Abstract, Geology, 28: 569-571.

! R.V. Tyson (1987): Part I: Concepts and Methods. The genesis and palynofacies characteristics of marine petroleum source rocks. Abstract, Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 26: 47-67.

! G.A. Upchurch Jr. (1989): Dispersed angiosperm cuticles. In PDF, Notes for a Workshop on the Study of Fragmentary Plant Remains.

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Palynofacies.

J. Yans et al. (2010): Carbon-isotope analysis of fossil wood and dispersed organic matter from the terrestrial Wealden facies of Hautrage (Mons Basin, Belgium). In PDF, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 291: 85-105.











Home / Palynology / Acritarchs


Categories
Palynolocical Associations
Palynology
Palynofacies
Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others
! Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
! Triassic Palynology@
! Palynology Databases@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@


Acritarchs

Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley: Dinoflagellata: Fossil Record.

Commission Internationale de Microflore du Paléozoique (C.I.M.P.). C.I.M.P. is an international federation of palynologists interested in Palaeozoic palynology. The commission aims to advance knowledge in palynology and related subjects by the promotion of international co-operation and meetings between scientists of all regions and countries.
Worth checking out: Links.

Owen Davis: ACRITARCS.

David Gelsthorpe, Geology Department, University of Leicester: The acritarchs.

! Linda E. Graham, Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin, Madison & Lee W. Wilcox: Algae. A new textbook published by Prentice Hall.

Jere H. Lipps, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley, CA (The Cushman Foundation for Foraminiferal Research): Fossil Prokaryotes and Protists: a Slide Set. The Cushman Foundation, a non-profit public foundation, was founded for the purpose of publishing results of research on Foraminiferida and allied organisms. Go to: Acritarchs.

Giles Miller (website hosted by Natural History Museum, London): Curator of Micropalaeontology´s Blog.

G.L. Mullins et al., Department of Geology, University of Leicester: The phytoPal project. About Proterozoic and Palaeozoic phytoplankton (fossil cysts of acritarchs, the phycomata of prasinophyte algae and very rare zygotes of zygnematalean algae). See also:
The phytoPal Reference Database. PDF file, Proterozoic and Palaeozoic phytoplankton bibliography (contributions by R. J. Aldridge, K. J. Dorning and M. Vecoli).

Gary Mullins, Geology Department, University of Leicester: Acritarcha Evitt, 1963.

Unit of Micropalaeontology, University College, London (website written, designed and produced by Matthew Olney, University College, London, U.K., now at Northern Illinois University, U.S.A.): MIRACLE, the Microfossil Image Recovery And Circulation for Learning and Education web-site. Go to: Acritarchs and Chitinozoa.

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Acritarchs.











Home / Palynology / Silicoflagellates and Others


Categories
Palynolocical Associations
Palynology
Palynofacies
Acritarchs
! Teaching Documents about Palynology and Palynofacies@
! Palynological Preparation Techniques@
! Triassic Palynology@
! Palynology Databases@
Palaeobotanists Personal Pages@
Focused on Palaeoclimate@
Teaching Documents about Palaeobotany@
Introductions to both Fossil and Recent Plant Taxa@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Palaeontology@
Glossaries, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias: Botany@


Dinoflagellates, Silicoflagellates and Others


William H. Abbott, Nanno-Chron International, Inc., Waxahachie, Texas: Calcareous Nannofossil Biostratigraphy, Links.

Al Alcazar, Hooper Virtual Natural History Museum, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Diatoms.

Answers.com (previously GuruNet), New York City & Jerusalem: Coccolithophorida.

Assure Controls, Inc., Vista, California: What is a Dinoflagellate?

Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley: Introduction to the Dinoflagellata.

The Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem (BGBM): German speaking diatomists.

Ian Boomer (University of Newcastle), and Giles Miller (Natural History Museum, London): Micropalaeontological Web Sites.

britanica.com: dinoflagellate. Encyclopædia Britannica article. See also: Protozoan, General features.

Tony Butcher, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Portsmouth: Chitinozoans....what are they?

Thomas P. Dolley, U.S. Geological Survey: Diatomite Statistics and Information. See also DIATOMITE (PDF file).

Danielle Drayton, Department of Biology, University of Miami: Welcome to the Fascinating World of Phylum Dinoflagellata (now via wayback archive). Information about dinoflagellate morphology, life history and evolution of dinoflagellates.

! Susanne Feist-Burkhardt, Andrew S. Henderson and Iona McLachlan, The Natural History Museum, London: Duxbury (1983) database of Cretaceous dinoflagellate cysts. The database contains new, high quality colour images of Stanley Duxbury's (1983) type and figured specimens, from the Micropalaeontology Collections of the NHM. In addition to transmitted light images using Differential Interference Contrast, specimens were imaged using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). See also here.

J. Hill and K. Davis, Geology Rocks: The Use Of Diatoms As Palaeoenvironmental Indicators.

Rob Fensome, Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic), Andrew MacRae, and Graham Williams, Dinoflagellate Classification Database (DINOFLAJ): Bibliographical references.

Rob Fensome, Andrew MacRae, and Graham Williams, Project of the Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic): Dinoflagellate Classification Database (DINOFLAJ). DINOFLAJ is a database system containing a current classification of fossil and living dinoflagellates down to generic rank, and an index of fossil dinoflagellates at generic, specific, and infraspecific ranks.

Kenneth L. Finger, Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley, CA: What Are Microfossils?

Anthony G. Futcher, Columbia Union College, Maryland: Plant Diversity. A lot of facts about plant groups, fungi, plant-like protists, and monerans, including taxonomy, life cycles, general structure, and representative genera. Go to: Division Pyrrophyta - Dinoflagellates and Cryptomonads.

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP): Micropaleontological Reference Centers. MRCs provide scientists with an opportunity to examine microfossils of various geologic ages, and from a globally distributed set of locations.

The International Research Group on Charophytes (IRGC). The aims of IRGC are to promote and coordinate international cooperation in charophyte research, including living and fossil material of all geological periods, and to encourage the integration and synthesis of all aspects of both botanical and paleobotanical study of charophytes.

International Society for Diatom Research (ISDR). Go to: Links to other sites.

Jérémy Jacob et al.: New insights into the chemical composition of chitinozoans. Abstract, Organic Geochemistry Article in Press (2007), 17 p.

Harold L. Levin, Washington University, St. Louis: The Earth Through Time. Book announcement. Go to: Seventh Edition, Chapter 12, Life of the Mesozoic. Website by Pamela J. W. Gore, Georgia Perimeter College, Clarkston, GA. See also: Mesozoic Life in the Seas.

Svenolov Lindgren, Stockholm University: Dinoflagellates. See also: Lindgren Labs for Paleontology & Biology. Provides information e.g. about peridinioid dinoflagellates from the Upper Cretaceous of Trelleborg, southern Sweden.

Jere H. Lipps, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley, CA (The Cushman Foundation for Foraminiferal Research): Fossil Prokaryotes and Protists: a Slide Set. The Cushman Foundation, a non-profit public foundation, was founded for the purpose of publishing results of research on Foraminiferida and allied organisms.

The Low Latitudes Dinoflagellates Working Group. (part of the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists).

! Fabienne Marret and Karin A. F. Zonneveld (Pangaea, Network for Geological and Environmental Data): Atlas of modern organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst distribution (PDF file). This atlas summarises the global distribution of extant organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in the form of 61 maps illustrated by the relative abundance of individual cyst taxa in recent marine sediments. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Volume 125, Issues 1-2, Pages 1-200, (2003).

Ana Martín-González et al. (2009): Double fossilization in eukaryotic microorganisms from Lower Cretaceous amber. BMC Biol. 2009; 7: 9.

R. Mathieu et al.: Manuel de Micropaléontologie . (in French). The Handbook of Micropaleontology. See also here (in PDF).

Kevin McCartney, Northern Maine Museum of Science, University of Maine, Presque Isle, ME: Silicoflagellates.

Andrew MacRae, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary: What is paleopalynology?, Go to: Dinoflagellates.

K. Matsuoka, Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Science Faculty of Fisheries, Nagasaki University, and Y. Fukoyo Asian Natural Environmental Science Center, University of Tokyo (2000): Technical guide for modern dinoflagellate cyst study. PDF file.

! L.K. Medlin (2009): Diatoms (Bacillariophyta). PDF file, In: S.B. Hedges and S. Kumar (eds.): The Timetree of Life (see here).

The Micropalaeontological Society (TMS): The Silicofossil Group, Links.

Giles Miller (website hosted by Natural History Museum, London): Curator of Micropalaeontology´s Blog.

Nikon Microscopy: Digital Image Galleries Including diatoms and radiolarians.

North American Diatom Symposium (NADS). Being held on 23-27 September 2009 at the Iowa Lakeside Laboratory in northwest Iowa. The North American Diatom Symposium is held every two years at field stations throughout North America and is the premier venue for all aspects of diatom research.

Charles J. O´Kelly and and Tim Littlejohn: Peridinium. The Protist Image Database.

Matthew Olney, Micropalaeontology Unit, University College, London (now at Northern Illinois University, U.S.A.): An insight into micropalaeontology. The purpose of this site is to provide an introduction to the subject of micropalaeontology based on microfossil images. Use the dark blue text to navigate around the site. Go to:
Palynology.
Spores and Pollen.
Acritarchs and Chitinozoa.
Dinoflagellates.
Diatoms. See also:
The Link Page, containing an alphabetical list of links that may be of interest or use to anyone searching the world wide web on the subject of micropalaeontology.

Florentin Paris and Danièle Bernard, Géosciences, Université de Rennes I, France: Chitinozoans - List of species. Alphabetic list of chitinozoan species (sub-species and "varieties") described up to now.

The Latz Research Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, Dinoflagellates: This section describes the life history and ecology of dinoflagellates, and explains how and why they produce bioluminescence.

P.A. Sims et al. (2006): Evolution of the diatoms: insights from fossil, biological and molecular data. PDF file, Phycologia 45: 361–402.

P. Roger Sweets, Biology Department, University of Indianapolis: Paleolimnology & Diatom Home Pages. Web pages concentrating on the science of paleolimnology and of general interest to diatomists and other phycologists.

SYNTHESYS: Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research and collections, Ingeborg Soulie-Marsche. About modern and fossil Charophytes.

! Fabienne Marret and Karin A. F. Zonneveld (page hosted by PANGAEA) Dino-Atlas. Atlas of modern organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst distribution (PDF file). Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Volume 125, Issues 1-2, Pages 1-200; 2003. This Atlas summarises the global distribution of extant organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in the form of 61 maps illustrated by the relative abundance of individual cyst taxa in recent marine sediments from the Atlantic Ocean and adjacent basins, the Antarctic region (South Atlantic, south-western Pacific and southern Indian Ocean sections), the Arabian Sea and the north-western Pacific.

Unit of Micropalaeontology, University College, London (website written, designed and produced by Matthew Olney, University College, London, U.K., now at Northern Illinois University, U.S.A.): MIRACLE, the Microfossil Image Recovery And Circulation for Learning and Education web-site. Go to: Dinoflagellates.

M. Zaton et al. (2005): Late Triassic charophytes around the bone-bearing bed at Krasiejów (SW Poland) -- palaeoecological and environmental remarks. PDF file, Acta Geologica Polonica, 55: 83-293.










Top of page
Links for Palaeobotanists
Search in all "Links for Palaeobotanists" Pages!
index sitemap advanced
site search by freefind


This index is compiled and maintained by Klaus-Peter Kelber, Würzburg,
e-mail
kp-kelber@t-online.de
Last updated February 03, 2014



















eXTReMe Tracker